Tag Archives: SCFSP

Videos: Food at Griffis Fish Camp on the Suwannee River with Seminole Pumpkin 2023-12-09

Part four is videos of the food at Campfire Cookout at Griffis Fish Camp and Suwannee River Paddle including what happened to the Seminole pumpkin C.B. “Turtleman” Adams gave us back in part zero.

[Food and Seminole Pumpkin at Griffis Fish Camp, Suwannee River 2023-12-09]
Food and Seminole Pumpkin at Griffis Fish Camp, Suwannee River 2023-12-09

Spoiler: it got cooked and eaten, after the seeds were saved by several people for planting.

Here’s the video:
https://youtu.be/hh1lEWsC9VE Continue reading

Videos: Suwannee River Sill Ramp to Griffis Fish Camp 2023-12-09

Update 2023-12-19: Videos: Food at Griffis Fish Camp on the Suwannee River with Seminole Pumpkin 2023-12-09

Part three is video highlights of Campfire Cookout at Griffis Fish Camp and Suwannee River Paddle from Suwannee River Sill Ramp through the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge to Griffis Fish Camp.

[From Suwannee River Sill Ramp to Griffis Fish Camp 2023-12-09]
From Suwannee River Sill Ramp to Griffis Fish Camp 2023-12-09

Here’s the video:
https://youtu.be/Jxg6dZ5pn2Y


Videos: SCFSP to Suwannee River Sill 2023-12-09
Videos by John S. Quarterman for WWALS Watershed Coalition (WWALS).

For more WWALS outings and events as they are posted, see the WWALS outings web page, https://wwals.net/outings/. WWALS members also get an upcoming list in the Tannin Times newsletter.

 -jsq, John S. Quarterman, Suwannee RIVERKEEPER®

You can help with clean, swimmable, fishable, drinkable, water in the 10,000-square-mile Suwannee River Basin in Florida and Georgia by becoming a WWALS member today!
https://wwals.net/donations

Videos: Suwannee River Sill to Lunch, Suwannee River 2023-12-09

Update 2023-12-14: Videos: Suwannee River Sill Ramp to Griffis Fish Camp 2023-12-09

Here’s the second part of the Paddle on Campfire Cookout at Griffis Fisth Camp and Suwannee River Paddle: through the Suwannee River Sill to lunch at the Sill Ramp, all in the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge.

[From Suwannee River Sill to Lunch 2023-12-09]
From Suwannee River Sill to Lunch 2023-12-09

Here’s the video:
https://youtu.be/oEJJLBMJhA4?si=bT1I2Ho5tMVT4qQ2

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Videos: SCFSP to Suwannee River Sill 2023-12-09

Update 2023-12-13: Videos: Suwannee River Sill to Lunch, Suwannee River 2023-12-09

Here are some video highlights of the first part of the Paddle on Campfire Cookout at Griffis Fisth Camp and Suwannee River Paddle: Stephen C. Foster State Park through the Narrows to the Suwannee River Sill, all in the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge.

[From Stephen C. Foster State Park to the Suwannee River Sill 2023-12-09]
From Stephen C. Foster State Park to the Suwannee River Sill 2023-12-09

Here’s the video:


Videos: SCFSP to Suwannee River Sill 2023-12-09
Videos by John S. Quarterman for WWALS Watershed Coalition (WWALS).

For more WWALS outings and events as they are posted, see the WWALS outings web page, https://wwals.net/outings/. WWALS members also get an upcoming list in the Tannin Times newsletter.

 -jsq, John S. Quarterman, Suwannee RIVERKEEPER®

You can help with clean, swimmable, fishable, drinkable, water in the 10,000-square-mile Suwannee River Basin in Florida and Georgia by becoming a WWALS member today!
https://wwals.net/donations

Pictures: Arriving Floyd’s Island, Okefenokee Swamp 2023-11-04

Update 2023-11-19: Floyds Island 1838, Hebard Cabin 1925, Okefenokee Swamp 1925-01-01.

Alligators and pitcher plants on the Suwannee River to Floyds Island, logging railroad, Indian mound, and tents there, and somebody fell over in a chair.

[IG: Collage, SCFSP to Floyds Island, Okefenokee Swamp, 2023-11-04]
IG: Collage, SCFSP to Floyds Island, Okefenokee Swamp, 2023-11-04

People came to the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge from as far away as Miami, Alabama, South Carolina, Savannah, and Atlanta, as well as from Williston, White Springs, Pearson, Douglas, and Hahira.

Thanks to Shirley Kokidko for organizing, and for Randy Madison for leading when Shirley could not go. Continue reading

Campfire Cooking at Griffis Fish Camp and Suwannee River paddle, 2023-12-08-10

Update 2023-12-01: South Georgia Naturalist Chris Adams to speak at WWALS Griffis Fish Campout and Okefenokee Swamp and Suwannee River Paddle 2023-11-08.

Join us to camp overnight Friday at Griffis Fish Camp.

On Saturday, paddle 9.5 miles down the Suwannee River from SCFSP through the Okefenokee Swamp National Wildlife Refuge, the Narrows, and the Sill to Griffis, to camp overnight again.

Each night, build a campfire and start cooking.

When: Arrive 4 PM, Friday, December 8, 2023, sunset 5:26 PM.
Gather 9 AM, Saturday, December 9, 2023, launch 9:30 AM, sunset 5:26 PM
Sunday, December 10, 2023, wake up and head on home.

Campground: Griffis Fish Camp, 10333 Ga Highway 177 Fargo, Georgia 31631. From Fargo, travel south on US 441 to CR 177; turn left and travel 10 miles northeast; Griffis Fish Camp is on left, in Clinch County.

Campground GPS: 30.78246, -82.443594

Put In: Stephen C. Foster State Park Ramp, 17515 GA-177, Fargo, GA 31631. From Fargo, travel south on US 441 to CR 177; turn left and travel to Stephen C. Foster State Park, in Charlton County.

Put In GPS: 30.826833, -82.361333

[Suwannee River, Okefenokee Swamp, Griffis Fish Camp, Campfire Cooking]
Suwannee River, Okefenokee Swamp, Griffis Fish Camp, Campfire Cooking

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Okefenokee Floyd’s Island Campout, Suwannee River, 2023-11-04-5

Update 2023-11-18: Pictures: Arriving Floyd’s Island, Okefenokee Swamp 2023-11-04.

Update 2023-09-06: The park limits reservations on Floyd’s Island to 20 people. To reserve your spot, RSVP on the meetup:
https://www.meetup.com/withlacoochee-alapaha-suwannee-rivers-wwals-outings/events/295388408/
You will also need to pay for your 20th of the reservation fee through the eventbrite ticket you will find on the meetup.

Update 2023-09-05: Floyd’s Island is reserved for WWALS for this outing.

Update 2023-08-14: SCFSP campsite is closed for renovations from November 1, 2023, until January 2025. But you can still pre-camp at Griffis Fish Camp if you reserve early.

Join us (pending a reservation for the island) to paddle 9 miles upstream in the Okefenokee for primitive camping on Floyd’s Island, which is the most remote place in Georgia: the farthest from any road, with very dark sky.

This primitive campout is a remote wilderness experience in the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge, appropriate for any level but be sure that you’re comfortable paddling your loaded kayak 9 miles against a current to get to the island. There is only one rest stop on the trail, Minnie’s Lake Platform at the 4 mile mark.

Coming back on Sunday the current will be with us all the way, making for an easy trip out on the most scenic trail in the swamp with plenty of wildlife viewing.

There is a portapotty at Minnie’s Lake and another at Floyd’s Island. No potable water, bring everything you need for two days. There is plenty of room for any type tent or hammock. The historic Floyd’s Cabin is also open.

When: Gather 9 AM, launch 10 AM, Saturday, November 4, 2023, overnight and return Sunday

Put In: Stephen C. Foster State Park Ramp (SCFSP), 17515 GA-177, Fargo, GA 31631. From Fargo, travel south on US 441 to CR 177; turn left and travel to Stephen C. Foster State Park in Charlton County.
Plan accordingly to arrive on time, phone service is mostly nonexistent once you leave Fargo, Ga. and drive the 17 miles to Stephen C. Foster State Park.

GPS: 30.826833, -82.361333

[Ready at SCFSP John S. Quarterman 2022-11-19, at Floyd's Island --Gretchen Quarterman 2022-11-06]
Ready at SCFSP John S. Quarterman 2022-11-19, at Floyd’s Island –Gretchen Quarterman 2022-11-06

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Comments: 20,338 on titanium mining near Okefenokee Swamp –USACE 2019-09-12

If this and the 27 news articles on radio, TV, and newspapers in Georgia and Florida, several of them carried by Associated Press across the country, plus the ten op-eds and three editorials, is not enough to establish controversy, I wonder what is. Maybe still more comments and news articles and social media?

[Public Notice: 20,338 comments]
Public Notice: 20,338 comments
PDF

Nedra Rhone, Atlanta Journal-Constitution, 13 September 2019, Mining proposal near Okefenokee draws more than 20K comments from public

The Suwannee Riverkeeper, on Thursday, sent 22 pages of questions to the Corps and the Georgia Department of Environmental Protection asking the agency to deny the permit. The Riverkeeper joined the SELC and other organizations and individuals in asking the Corps to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement, the highest level of analysis available when a proposed federal action may significantly affect the quality of the human environment.

Also in that AJC story:

Commenters expressed concerns ranging from the acres of wetlands that would be lost to what they considered inadequate studies conducted to determine the potential impact of the mine.

In a letter to the Corps, the Southern Environmental Law Center said Continue reading

Deny or EIS, titanium mining near Okefenokee Swamp –Suwannee Riverkeeper for WWALS 2019-09-12

Sent just now as PDF. You can still send in your comments today.

[Who wants to boat, fish, bird, or hunt next to a strip mine?]
Who wants to boat, fish, bird, or hunt next to a strip mine? PDF


September 12, 2019

To: Col. Daniel Hibner, Commander, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Savannah District
       Attention: Ms. Holly Ross,  holly.a.ross@usace.army.mil
       1104 North Westover Boulevard, Suite 9, Albany, Georgia  31707

Cc: Stephen Wiedl, Wetlands Unit, stephen.wiedl@dnr.ga.gov
       Georgia Department of Natural Resources, Environmental Protection Division,
       Water Protection Branch, 7 Martin Luther King, Jr. Drive, Atlanta, GA 30334

Re: Applicant: Twin Pines Minerals, LLC, Application Number: SAS-2018-00554

Dear Colonel Hibner,

Suwannee Riverkeeper for WWALS Watershed Coalition (WWALS) asks USACE:

  • to reject the subject Application from Twin Pines Minerals (TPM), given the inappropriate location which would over the years move ever closer to the Okefenokee Swamp, which is the headwaters of the Suwannee and St. Mary’s Rivers, combined with the numerous omissions from the Application regarding the wide hydrogeologic, water quality, ecologic, and economic ramifications of the proposed mining, and the numerous other mines relevant to the proposal.

If USACE continues to process the Application, WWALS requests USACE:

  • to require a complete hydrogeological assessment and report, a full Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), and an economic analysis, with all three covering all the relevant features, mines, and applications in south Georgia and north Florida, including at least those outlined in this letter.
  • to accept comments until at least ninety days after all these documents are submitted to USACE and distributed to the public, preferably on USACE’s website, without requiring site visits to Albany to get them.
  • to hold public hearings in Georgia and Florida for further independent input and review after sufficient time (months or years) for independent third-party review.

The proposed Charlton County, Georgia, TPM mine site is hydraulically upgradient from the Okefenokee Swamp and within close proximity to the boundary of the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge (ONWR), with its 600,000 visits per year for boating, birding, and fishing, with more than $60 million annual economic effects including hundreds of jobs supported directly or indirectly, plus hunt clubs surrounding the Swamp. The Swamp provides ecosystem services of great economic values, including storm protection, water quality provisioning, support for nursery and habitat for commercial fishing species; and carbon storage, plus those hunt clubs depend on the Swamp. Any pollution of the Swamp or change in surface or groundwater levels could adversely affect not only ONWR and nearby areas, but also the Okefenokee Swamp Park (OSP) near Waycross, in Ware County, GA, and Stephen C. Foster State Park (SCFSP) in Charlton County, via Fargo in Clinch County. Visitors come from Jacksonville, Florida, Brunswick and Valdosta, Georgia, and from much farther away to visit the Okefenokee Swamp. The Swamp is a treasure to the entire nation and the world.

The stigma of a strip mine next to the swamp could cause people to turn away, taking their dollars with them. Who wants to boat, fish, bird, or hunt next to a strip mine?

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