Tag Archives: bridge

Earl Wetherington Foot Bridge

Maybe this bridge was named for Earl Wetherington Foot, since it has vehicular traffic. Since I can’t find any mention of such a person, maybe it was named for Earl Wetherington (1925-2013) and once upon a time was a foot bridge. Anyway, it’s on Gornto Road in Valdosta, Lowndes County, Georgia, over Sugar Creek, slightly upstream from the Withlacoochee River.

Bridge, Over Sugar Creek

Bridge, Over Sugar Creek

It was closed in the “700-year” flood of 2013, which followed the “700-year” flood of 2009 (I think it was closed then, too). Continue reading

Capt. Henry Will Jones Bridge, Alapaha River, Lakeland, Lanier County, GA

Nobody seems to know the bridge just east of Lakeland has a name: Captain Henry Will Jones Bridge. Just below it is Lakeland Boat Ramp on the Alapaha River Water Trail (ARWT). We’ll be going by there in a few months on the Alapaha Quest.

Scott Thompson, Pieces of Our Past, November 30, 2015, CAPTAIN HENRY WILL JONES,

Captain Henry Will Jones

Henry Will Jones was born about 1917 in what became Lanier County just as our country was entering World War I. After Continue reading

Aerials: Dry Alapaha River and the Alapaha Rise 2016-11-23

The Alapaha River is dry much of the year in most of its Florida run, because it goes underground upstream and comes back up in the Alapaha Rise, which is actually upstream on the Suwannee River from the Alapaha Confluence. The Cody Scarp causes this underground river phenomenon. See also the WWALS Alapaha River Water Trail.

CR 751 bridge, dry Alapaha River, 30.4485760, -83.0968860

CR 751 bridge, dry Alapaha River,

Alapaha River Confluence with Suwannee River, 30.4368660, -83.0982100

Continue reading

US 41 access to Withlacoochee River

On the north side of US 41, there’s good access from Val Del Road to the Withlacoochee River.

Turnoff from Val Del Road 30.8961964, -83.3201294 From US 41 (North Valdosta Road), turn north on Val Del Road, and your next right is a turnoff to a gravelled road that bends sharply right into the woods, which leads back to the north side of US 41 and down to the Withlacoochee River. It was a bit muddy in the rain this morning, but there were no big potholes, and the river slope is easy access. The river was high, 9.8 feet, but still well below the 15 foot flood level on the US 41 Gage on this bridge.

Withlacoochee River and US 41 bridge

Continue reading

Old Bridge over Alapahoochee River

Nice to look at, but not for driving. Chris Mericle reports:

300x225 River and bridge, in Old Bridge over the Alapahoochee River, by Chris Mericle, for WWALS.net, 3 January 2015 Here are some photos of an old bridge across the Alapahoochee River that Deanna and I came across while out exploring the other day.

Driving or even walking across this bridge probably shouldn’t be recommended. Continue reading

Withlacoochee River Outing: Clyattville-Nankin Road to GA 31

The June WWALS outing is from Clyattville-Nankin Road to Horn Bridge on Sun tree Madison Highway (GA 31) on the Withlacoochee River. Meet at the Clyattville-Nankin Road putin at 9AM, put in at 10AM, Saturday, 22 June 2013. Join the facebook event if you like. See you there!

Update 20 June 2013: How are we getting back to our vehicles with this trip? We’ll deposit all the boats at the put-in (Clyattville-Nankin Road), take most of the vehicles down to the take-out (Horn Bridge on Madison Highway aka GA 31), carpool in a few vehicles back to the put-in, and float down the river.

Tom Baird described this nine-mile two-hour trip as:

The section includes where Clyatt Mill Creek enters, a truly fun set of rapids (two drops) at the Ga – Fla border, a very nice Second Magnitude Spring (that I have yet to find the correct name), the remains of the enormous abandoned trestle over the river of the Georgia & Florida Railroad, or Ole God Forsaken as it was nicknamed, the ghost town of Olympia on the Georgia side, and several Indian quarry sites. It is along this section that the river cuts deeply enough that the banks switch from sand banks to limerock cliffs. Paddle distance is about 9 miles, so a little over two hours paddling time. There are plenty of places to stop and look around.

There are shoals right at the state line, so beware, esp. if you’re in a canoe. The book Canoeing and Kayaking Georgia, by Susanne Welander, Bob Sehlinger, and Don Otey (2004) says: Continue reading